The Closely-Guarded Tradition of the Tibetan Sky Funeral

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Chopped up and fed to the vultures, a glimpse into the closely-guarded tradition of the Tibetan sky funeral | Mail Online.

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Landmark Photography of the American Civil War – Exhibit

More than 200 of the finest and most poignant photographs of the American Civil War have been brought together for the landmark exhibition Photography and the American Civil War, opening April 2 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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[Captain Charles A. and Sergeant John M. Hawkins, Company E,

 

Sojourner Truth,

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A display of three photographs of American Civil War soldiers in the exhibition, “Photography and the American Civil War” April 1, 2013 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The three albumen silver prints are all by Gayford & Speidel, “Private Christopher Anderson, Company F, 108th Regiment, U.S. Colored Infantry, January–May 1865” (L), “Private Louis Troutman, Company F, 108th Regiment, U.S. Colored Infantry, January–May 1865”, (C) and “Private Gid White, Company F, 108th Regiment, U.S. Colored Infantry, January–May 1865”, (R). AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA.

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Landmark exhibition considers evolving role of photography during American Civil War.

Richard I’s Heart Was Preserved With Creosote

 

Richard I of England’s heart was preserved with mercury and tar before being “sweetened” with herbs to make it smell nice after his death, researchers have found.

Forensic scientists analysed the organ of the king – called The Lionheart – after removing his remains from a church in France where part of his body was laid to rest.

They found that embalmers preparing him for burial after death had used mercury and tar-like creosote to preserve the heart.

The organ had then been daubed with frankincense, myrtle, daisy and mint to make it smell sweet, before it was wrapped in linen and placed in a lead-lined box.

Forensic expert Philippe Charlier, who led the team that carried out the research, said there may have been an attempt to make the body part holier.

He said: “We found things that we didn’t expect.

 

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Richard I’s Heart Was Preserved With Creosote.